AFP: Wikileaks release has not broken laws (yet)

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The Australian Federal Police (AFP) has concluded that Wikileaks has not broken any Australian law when it released the United States diplomatic cables last month, ending some weeks investigating the matter after being referred to them by Attorney-General Robert McClelland.

“The AFP has completed its evaluation of the material available and has not established the existence of any criminal offences where Australia would have jurisdiction,” it concluded.

There is a catch, however, it only reflects what it is already released – which stands at 1,618 cables out of the 251,287 cables collected. Any further releases will be examined by the AFP in order to reach a conclusion of it violating any laws in Australia. (The slow nature of releasing the cables is to redact the names of some people in order to prevent a potential risk to their lives after giving the information to a US diplomat)

The Government’s response to the release of diplomatic cables has been mixed, with some supporting him and some condemning his actions. Notable people are Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd, who came in support of Assange, and Prime Minister Julia Gillard, who was the first condemn that actions – labelling them “illegal” before┬áback-peddling.

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