iiNet withdraws from the filtering trial

By on

iiNet has said that it has advised the Federal Government that it would be withdrawing from discussions to participate in the internet filtering trial, saying that constant changes in policies and confusing explanations of the trial’s purpose affected discussions.

Recent revelations of the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s blacklist, which no one has knowledge, unless you view it on Wikileaks, as it is not under the Freedom of Information, was also another factor in why the discussions failed.

Michael Malone, the Managing Director, previously said that the third largest ISP agreed to participate was to demonstrate that it was fundamentally flawed, a waste of taxpayers’ money and that it would not work.

“We are not able to reconcile participation in the trial with our corporate social responsibility, our customer service objectives and our public position on censorship,” Malone said in a statement.

“It became increasingly clear that the trial was not simply about restricting child pornography or other such illegal material, but a much wider range of issues including what the Government simply describes as “unwanted material” without an explanation of what that includes.”

Malone also said that the government should re-think its approach of the filter, and make clear what its intentions of using internet censorship which has attracting international dismay of using a filter.

“Everyone is repulsed by, and opposed to, child pornography but this trial and policy is not the solution or
even about that,” he continues. “In reality, the vast majority of online child pornography activity does not appear on public websites but is distributed over peer-to-peer networks which are not and cannot be captured by this trial or policy.”